Our story

18th century

Our story begins in the Duchesnay Seigneury. A rugged area of lakes, mountains and trees that lies north of Quebec City.

After the English conquest of Canada in 1759, many English, Scottish and Irish settlers crossed the ocean to join the new lands of what soon became known as the “Waterloo Settlement”, inspired by the name of the infamous Belgian battle.

In the middle of the 19th Century, a Scottish man by the name of Archibald Simons made the decision to make this settlement his home, hoping to raise his family and make his living far from the St-Lawrence’s banks. Like all of the settlers in the area, Simons was faced with challenging the elements, having to clear the rough and mountainous terrain to build his home and his business. His house remains standing to this day and can be found on the “rang du Brulé”, in the area now known as Lac-Beauport.

The tall pines, serene lake, and beautiful mountains served as inspiration

In 2005, the Lac-Beauport region charmed the founders of Archibald Microbrasserie in the same way it did to settler’s centuries ago. The tall pines, serene lake, and beautiful mountains served as inspiration for the inception of a brand new concept in the area, a Brewpub. The founders hoped to provide the people with the opportunity to live life to the fullest and enjoy a one-of-a-kind, high-quality food experience with their beer, complementing the beauty of the wilderness.

Embodying the values of the first settlers in the region, they chose to paddle into uncharted waters by taking an entirely new approach to brewing beer.

Focusing on the importance of family and authentic cuisine, they created a family of beers that according to legend, represent the women from Archibald Simons’ life.

This is why the beers of Archibald Microbrewery all bear the imprint of women. These are the women who made family success possible, fed empty stomachs and told stories by the fire.

Today, our beers & restaurants bring family and friends together, to eat, drink, laugh, share and dance, as in days gone by at the Waterloo settlement.